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Free Essay Comedy In Waiting For Godot

Essay Hope in Waiting for Godot and Wall E

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The individual and society living in the 20th Century has changed a great deal. This is shown in many texts such as animated film Wall E created by Pixar and Waiting for Godot written by Samuel Beckett, an Irish writer, dramatist and poet. The major wars that happened in the 20th Century which were WWI, World War II and the Cold War affected many writers’ opinions and attitudes to everything in the world and all the mass murder and bombings had caused so much misery and torment. Waiting for Godot was written during the Cold War and World War II so this reflected on Samuel Beckett’s attitude on plain life. Samuel Beckett implied that there was no meaning to life and we were ‘Waiting for Godot’, our savior, who never comes. Conversely, the…show more content…

The notion of hope is highlighted throughout the play when either Vladimir or Estragon says “Let’s go,” then the other would reply “We can’t, we’re waiting for Godot.” This quote conveys that at least one of the two tramps has hope and is waiting for Godot.
This all shows the true attitude of Samuel Beckett which is human existence is pointless. An example of an absurdist scene is the scene of Lucky and his thinking hat. Lucky who is a slave of Pozzo is instructed to think for Estragon and Vladimir. As Lucky starts to think, the two tramps run in terror trying to hide behind the scenery like the thin tree and small rock then each other. Beckett’s attitude towards the individual and society living in the 20th century is negative. This is shown as the scenery and props are bleak. All the colours are gray and gloomy while the props i.e. tree looks dead and wilted. A very powerful technique that Beckett used was he stripped everything down to the bare necessity of things which meant he only used the necessary parts. Wall E is a computer animated science fiction film produced by Pixar Animation Studios which stars a rubbish compacting robot called Wall E. He is the only robot left on Earth after the Earth’s atmosphere becomes toxic due to all the rubbish that was built up over the years. In the film, Earth is not how it is today. There are still skyscrapers, but these are made from cubes which Wall E compacts. Despite

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"Waiting For Godot": Is It Useful To Consider This Play A Comedy?

"Waiting for Godot" is a particularly funny play revolving around two seemingly homeless men who are waiting for someone named Godot who, in no uncertain terms, will never arrive. There are multiple scenes revolving around the characters, particularly Estragon and Vladimir, acting out as clowns and being nonsensical, that appear to be fabricated with the sole purpose of invoking laughter. Undoubtedly, Waiting for Godot can be considered a comedy. However, the play is a prominent example of the group of plays considered of the theatre of the absurd genre. Considering this, and what the theatre of the absurd stands for (acknowledged or not), it can be said that while Waiting for Godot is a comedy, it is not necessarily useful to consider it as such.

It is useful to examine many plays as comedies, if for nothing else than to apply theories to them to further analyze exactly why we, as human beings, laugh. Waiting for Godot is not one of them because none of the theories of comedy apply to it. The excerpts from Esslin's book outlines the traditions typically associated with the theatre of the absurd, and Beckett's play clear lies within the limits. He quotes Ionesco in his introduction as saying "Absurd is what which is devoid of purpose... Cut off from his religious, metaphysical, and transcendental roots, man is lost; all his actions become senseless, absurd, useless." and this conveys the play's premise; Estragon and Vladimir continue to do things with no stated or assumable purpose other than to pass the time. They are constantly anticipating nightfall, simply because it marks the end of the day that they have spent doing nothing other than waiting. While it is known that the theatre of the absurd does not claim to be conscious of its placement within its category, plays that are defined as such project the senselessness of life and "abandonment of rational devices and discursive thought" (Esslin,...

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Compare and Contrast the structure of "Waiting for Godot" with the structure of any traditional play.

962 words - 4 pages Traditional drama, like in "Oedipus the King" by Sophocles, reflects a world view composed of a rational, well-ordered universe, a comforting system of beliefs (faith in something, someone), a stable scale of values, an ethical system in working condition. (Johnson, 2006). Beckett, in "Waiting for Godot", has turned away from the traditional drama and has an entirely different world view. This world view is marked by chaos instead of order....

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619 words - 2 pages In Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot two characters, Estragon and Vladmir are waiting for ‘Godot’ in which Beckett does not explain. Along with Estragon and Vlamir comes Lucky and Pozzo another two figures who add a bit of nonsense into the play to distract the reader from the real issue, waiting for Godot. Simply who or what is ‘Godot’, is the question that Beckett’s play raises. It is easy to say that Godot is a Christ figure or God,...

Waiting For Godot

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1039 words - 4 pages After reading Waiting for Godot, it seemed that the two main characters, Vladimir and Estragon didn't accomplish anything through the entire book. Yet, when looking at the book through an existentialism view, the characters are portraying what the true meaning of like really means. The use of repetition as a distraction from...

waiting for godot

1694 words - 7 pages [the role of (a forgetful) memory in "waiting for godot"] Samuel Barclay Beckett was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in Paris for most of his adult life and wrote in both English and French. His work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human...

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1731 words - 7 pages The setting is in the evening on a country road with a single tree present. Estragon is trying to pull off his boot, but without success. Vladimir enters and greets Estragon, who informs him that he has spent the night in a ditch where he was beaten. With supreme...

Affirmative Action, this is a position paper on affirmative action. It would be most useful for someone trying to say affirmative action is wrong.

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Absurdism in Waiting for Godot

1024 words - 4 pages Absurdism, a very well known term in the era of modern theatre has played a very significant role in the field of dramas. It’s significance and its presence in the modern theatre has created all together a different and a specific area in the world of theatre widely known as “the theater of the absurd”. Theatre of absurd was given its place in 1960’s by the American critic Martin Esslin. In a thought to make the audiences aware that there is...

Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot

1655 words - 7 pages In Samuel Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot, the scene opens to reveal a world characterized by bleakness. Though occasional situational humor enters the lives of Estragon and Vladimir, it is a sarcastic, ironic sort of humor that seems to mock the depressing situation in which they find themselves, and moments of hopefulness are overshadowed by uncertainty. The two merely sit and wait; they wait for a man, perhaps a savior, named Godot. That...

Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot

579 words - 2 pages An empty road, a single tree, a friends company. These sickly rewards are the ones given to men, theorizes Samuel Beckett in Waiting for Godot, when they wait for the arrival of God. Stark barren surroundings and perpetual loneliness are the only gift, in Beckett's mind, when one waits for a supernatural being who does not deign to visit mere mortals. This aloof and impersonal deity is symbolized in the aptly named character of Godot, who...